Claude Monet » Water Lilies 

(via 409inhiscoffee-maker)


mayameows:

estiqlal:

Afghan Female Artists: Nabila Horaksh And Shamsia Hassani 

Sound Central Festival, Kabul. 

2013 

I will one day go to Kabul to see the place my dad grew up. 



annanetrebko:

Vincent Van Gogh Terrasse de Cafe la Nuit

annanetrebko:

Vincent Van Gogh Terrasse de Cafe la Nuit

(via cottonomz)


retrogasm:

Gustav Klimt 

retrogasm:

Gustav Klimt 


Diego Rivera
Agrarian Leader Zapata
c. 1931

Diego Rivera

Agrarian Leader Zapata

c. 1931


Diego Rivera
Flower Festival Feast of Santa Anita
c. 1931

Diego Rivera

Flower Festival Feast of Santa Anita

c. 1931


Andy Warhol
Gold Marilyn Monroe
c. 1962

Andy Warhol

Gold Marilyn Monroe

c. 1962


Andy Warhol
Ten Foot Flowers
c. 1967

Andy Warhol

Ten Foot Flowers

c. 1967


art-history:

Henry Ossawa Tanner The Banjo Lesson  1893 Oil on canvas  49 x 35 in Hampton University Museum, Virginia 

In 1893, Tanner painted this work while in Philadelphia, to which he had returned from Paris to recover from typhoid fever. The Banjo Lesson was one of two genre paintings Tanner produced at a time in which poor southern blacks, still scarred by slavery, are presented with unsentimental dignity. The reserve of Tanner’s subjects departs from the traditional image of the gregarious black performer. The Banjo Lesson was painted three years before the Supreme Court decision Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), during a period when whites were committing lynchings and other crimes of intimidation to reestablish racial separation in the South. 
In this quiet scene a young boy is cradled in the arms of an older black man who holds up the neck of the banjo—an instrument too large for the boy to support. The boy tentatively strums the banjo with his awkwardly cocked right hand, while his left hand struggles with fingering. The two figures form a tight compositional and emotional unit, thoroughly absorbed in their world. They are situated in a simple, scrubbed domestic interior, the remains of a meal just eaten visible on the table in the background. An internal radiance sets off the massive dark brow and head of the man and illuminates the face of the young boy, a study in concentration. Knees spread wide, the man frames the boy in a metaphor of protection, tradition, and the bond furnished by music as it is passed from generation to generation. Tanner may have drawn this subject on travels to North Carolina before returning to Paris. As the art historian Judith Wilson has pointed out, Tanner transforms the conventional view of blacks as innately musical by emphasizing the role of teaching the transmission of black cultural forms. The young boy’s face is illuminated from the left, in a traditional metaphor of enlightenment. In their embrace of vernacular subjects, these works by Tanner look forward to twentieth-century black artists who explored the place of tradition in black cultural identity. 
—Angela L. Miller, et al., American Encounters: Art, History, and Cultural Identity (2008)

art-history:

Henry Ossawa Tanner 
The Banjo Lesson  1893 
Oil on canvas  49 x 35 in
Hampton University Museum, Virginia 

In 1893, Tanner painted this work while in Philadelphia, to which he had returned from Paris to recover from typhoid fever. The Banjo Lesson was one of two genre paintings Tanner produced at a time in which poor southern blacks, still scarred by slavery, are presented with unsentimental dignity. The reserve of Tanner’s subjects departs from the traditional image of the gregarious black performer. The Banjo Lesson was painted three years before the Supreme Court decision Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), during a period when whites were committing lynchings and other crimes of intimidation to reestablish racial separation in the South. 

In this quiet scene a young boy is cradled in the arms of an older black man who holds up the neck of the banjo—an instrument too large for the boy to support. The boy tentatively strums the banjo with his awkwardly cocked right hand, while his left hand struggles with fingering. The two figures form a tight compositional and emotional unit, thoroughly absorbed in their world. They are situated in a simple, scrubbed domestic interior, the remains of a meal just eaten visible on the table in the background. An internal radiance sets off the massive dark brow and head of the man and illuminates the face of the young boy, a study in concentration. Knees spread wide, the man frames the boy in a metaphor of protection, tradition, and the bond furnished by music as it is passed from generation to generation. Tanner may have drawn this subject on travels to North Carolina before returning to Paris. As the art historian Judith Wilson has pointed out, Tanner transforms the conventional view of blacks as innately musical by emphasizing the role of teaching the transmission of black cultural forms. The young boy’s face is illuminated from the left, in a traditional metaphor of enlightenment. In their embrace of vernacular subjects, these works by Tanner look forward to twentieth-century black artists who explored the place of tradition in black cultural identity. 

—Angela L. Miller, et al., American Encounters: Art, History, and Cultural Identity (2008)


art-history:

William H. Johnson Jitterbugs I  1940-41

Another academically trained cosmopolitan artist, William Johnson (1901-70) spent a decade in Denmark, returning in 1938 to invent his own folk idiom. He developed a simplified and monumentalized figural language drawing on such European artists as Picasso and Georges Rouault. But he also mined a range of other sources, from children’s art (he taught children at the WPA-funded Harlem Community Arts Center in 1939) to African art, to medieval tapestry (encountered through his Danish wife, the textile artist Holche Krake). In place, however, of the earlier emphasis of such artists as Elie Nadelman on the whimsical and decorative aspects of American folk art, Johnson devised a powerful and original style for painting the southern folk of his South Carolina childhood, their image intensified by his own transatlantic pilgrimage and subsequent homecoming. Like Marsden Hartley, Johnson honed himself as a painter in a variety of different styles, from academic naturalism to a vibrant expressionism. And, like Hartley, he eventually arrived at a self-described “modern-primitive” style informed by a sophisticated sense of abstraction. 
—Angela L. Miller, et al., American Encounters: Art, History, and Cultural Identity 2008)

art-history:

William H. Johnson 
Jitterbugs I  1940-41

Another academically trained cosmopolitan artist, William Johnson (1901-70) spent a decade in Denmark, returning in 1938 to invent his own folk idiom. He developed a simplified and monumentalized figural language drawing on such European artists as Picasso and Georges Rouault. But he also mined a range of other sources, from children’s art (he taught children at the WPA-funded Harlem Community Arts Center in 1939) to African art, to medieval tapestry (encountered through his Danish wife, the textile artist Holche Krake). In place, however, of the earlier emphasis of such artists as Elie Nadelman on the whimsical and decorative aspects of American folk art, Johnson devised a powerful and original style for painting the southern folk of his South Carolina childhood, their image intensified by his own transatlantic pilgrimage and subsequent homecoming. Like Marsden Hartley, Johnson honed himself as a painter in a variety of different styles, from academic naturalism to a vibrant expressionism. And, like Hartley, he eventually arrived at a self-described “modern-primitive” style informed by a sophisticated sense of abstraction. 

—Angela L. Miller, et al., American Encounters: Art, History, and Cultural Identity 2008)



freddie-d:

Audrey Hepburn Piece by Freddie D

freddie-d:

Audrey Hepburn Piece by Freddie D

(via artforadults)


Robert Rauschenberg
Factum II
c. 1957

Robert Rauschenberg

Factum II

c. 1957


Robert Rauschenberg
Bed
c.1955

Robert Rauschenberg

Bed

c.1955